The Price of War: Israeli paper carries photos of children killed in Gaza bombing

08:48 PM | 29 May, 2021
The Price of War: Israeli paper carries photos of children killed in Gaza bombing
Share

LONDON —Israeli daily Haaretz has printed pictures of the 67 children killed in the Israeli bombardment of Gaza on its front page. The headline “The Price of War” was printed alongside the pictures.

The pictures were linked to a New York Times article that Haaretz ran on Thursday with copy about Palestinian and Israeli children killed during the recent fighting.

Later, the publisher of Haaretz, Amos Schocken, reportedly apologised after criticism that the newspaper only displayed the pictures of Palestinian children and not Israeli children killed during the recent fighting in Gaza, when both had been mentioned in the article. Schocken attributed the “serious mistake” to an unspecified editor “who explained that we had already reported on their cases extensively and in real time”. 

Palestinian man shot dead by Israeli occupation forces in West Bank

The Palestinian health ministry says that Israeli forces shot dead a Palestinian man during clashes in the occupied West Bank on Friday.

Twenty-eight years old Zakaria Hamayel was struck by a bullet to the chest in Beita village, south of Nablus, during a protest against the Israeli settlement expansion on the Palestinian land, the ministry said. The Israeli army did not comment on the reported killing.

During the anti-settlement demonstration, some Palestinian protesters pelted Israeli soldiers with stones. 

Also, Israeli occupation forces killed a Palestinian man during a raid in the Al-Amari refugee camp near Ramallah on Tuesday. 

Israeli forces have been carrying out arrests across the West Bank following 11 days of Israeli bombing of Gaza. Israel started bombing of Gaza on May 10 and continued it until last week when Egypt brokered a truce between the two sides. 

The West Bank has been occupied since 1967, when the Israeli army captured it along with the Gaza Strip in the so-called Six-Day War.